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Denmark is taking a bold step towards a more sustainable aviation industry

Denmark is taking a bold step towards a more sustainable aviation industry by proposing a passenger tax on air travel. The Danish Government's plan involves imposing an average tax of 100 Danish krone or $14 on air travel, with the aim of financing a green transition in the airline industry. Lars Aagaard, Denmark’s Minister for Climate, Energy, and Utilities, emphasized the need for the aviation sector to reduce its climate footprint and move towards a greener future. He stated, "The aviation sector in Denmark must – just like all other industries – reduce its climate footprint and move towards a green future."

Denmark is taking a bold step towards a more sustainable aviation industry

Half of the expected annual revenue of 1.2 billion crowns from the proposed tax will be dedicated to funding the transition of domestic flights to green fuels by the end of the decade. Aagaard added, "The aviation sector in Denmark must – just like all other industries – reduce its climate footprint and move towards a green future."


The remaining half of the proceeds will be directly allocated to elderly individuals in the form of cash payments. The proposed passenger tax is set to be gradually introduced in 2025, with anticipated tax rates reaching around $9 for intra-European travel, $34 for medium-distance flights, and $56 for long-distance flights by 2030.


In addition to the financial measures, the Danish government aims to launch the first domestic route powered exclusively by green fuels by 2025, demonstrating its commitment to sustainable air travel.

Denmark is not alone in its efforts to address carbon emissions from air travel. The Netherlands has recently tripled its passenger tax, raising it from €8 to over €26 per flight ticket at the start of the year. The Dutch government believes that increasing the air passenger tax could lead to lower prices for both airline and train tickets, encouraging travelers to choose more sustainable transportation options.

Company formation

The broader context of sustainability in air travel has prompted action from consumer organizations. The European Consumer Organization and its 23 member organizations filed a complaint with the European Union Commission. They raised concerns about alleged misleading information and climate-related claims made by 17 airlines, accusing them of "greenwashing." The organizations argue that claims suggesting paying extra credits can effectively offset the carbon dioxide emissions of a flight are untrue, emphasizing the uncertainty surrounding the actual climate benefits of such offsetting efforts.


As countries like Denmark and the Netherlands take decisive steps to address the environmental impact of air travel, the aviation industry is facing increased scrutiny and calls for greater transparency in its efforts to achieve sustainability goals.

By fLEXI tEAM

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